Skip to content
April 15, 2013 / jimnv

SB 483 Says it All

SB 483 will eventually give back longevity and merit pay to state employees. These incentives were suspended in the last two legislative sessions (2009 and 2011).  The merit pay would be restored first and longevity last. This is small consolation for long time employees who no longer see merit increases in any case. This shows how the governor and legislature feels about long time employees. Not much. It’s not as if state employees are overpaid like some would say. On average they make about $48,000 a year. Further, there were just over 21,000 employees five years ago and there just over 14,000 now.

This attitude goes back to the late governor Kenny Guinn. His philosophy was, “Okay, let’s find a way to get rid of as many old timers as we can, shall we?” He did and every governor since that time has had the same and unwavering attitude toward old-time employees…. the fewer the better. Fewer older employees mean salaries are reset lower and there will be fewer longevity payments. Salary costs go down. Think lower retirement costs too.

————————

SB 483 AN ACT relating to state employees; extending the temporary suspension of the semiannual payment of longevity pay during the 2013-2015 biennium; extending the temporary suspension of merit pay increases during Fiscal Year 2013-2014; requiring state employees to take a certain salary reduction and, with certain exceptions, a number of days of unpaid furlough leave during the 2013-2015 biennium; and providing other matters properly relating thereto. http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Session/77th2013/Reports/history.cfm?ID=1081

As of April 3rd, it was exempt. Which means normal procedural rules do not apply. If passed, would become effective July 1, 2013. Here are some explainations from LCB website (complicated as most laws are):

Existing law provides for a plan to encourage continuity of service in State Government, under which semiannual payments are made to state employees rated standard or better with 8 years or more of continuous service, commonly known as “longevity pay.” (NRS 284.177) Existing law also provides for state employees who are rated standard or better and have not attained the top step of their grade to receive a merit pay increase annually. (NRS 284.175, 284.335; NAC 284.194, 284.196) Those longevity payments and merit pay increases were temporarily suspended by the Legislature during the 2009-2011 and 2011-2013 biennia. (Chapter 276, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 1164, as amended by chapter 465, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2642; Chapter 475, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2888) Section 1 of this bill continues the suspension of the longevity payments for the 2013-2015 biennium and continues the suspension of the merit pay increases for the Fiscal Year 2013-2014. During the 2009-2011 biennium, with certain exceptions, state employees were required to take a certain amount of unpaid furlough leave. (Chapter 391, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2159) During the 2011-2013 biennium, state employees were required to take a salary reduction of 2.5 percent and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that was equivalent to a 2.3 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction. (Chapter 374, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2219) Sections 2-5 of this bill require state employees to take a 2.5 percent salary reduction and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that is equivalent to a 1.15 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction.

Advertisements

3 Comments

Leave a Comment
  1. Amie C. Mcpherson / May 13 2013 8:03 pm

    Existing law provides for a plan to encourage continuity of service in State Government, under which semiannual payments are made to state employees rated standard or better with 8 years or more of continuous service, commonly known as “longevity pay.” (NRS 284.177) Existing law also provides for state employees who are rated standard or better and have not attained the top step of their grade to receive a merit pay increase annually. (NRS 284.175, 284.335; NAC 284.194, 284.196) Those longevity payments and merit pay increases were temporarily suspended by the Legislature during the 2009-2011 and 2011-2013 biennia. (Chapter 276, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 1164, as amended by chapter 465, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2642; Chapter 475, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2888) Section 1 of this bill continues the suspension of the longevity payments for the 2013-2015 biennium and continues the suspension of the merit pay increases for the Fiscal Year 2013-2014. During the 2009-2011 biennium, with certain exceptions, state employees were required to take a certain amount of unpaid furlough leave. (Chapter 391, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2159) During the 2011-2013 biennium, state employees were required to take a salary reduction of 2.5 percent and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that was equivalent to a 2.3 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction. (Chapter 374, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2219) Sections 2-5 of this bill require state employees to take a 2.5 percent salary reduction and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that is equivalent to a 1.15 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction.

  2. Bertha J. Garrison / May 9 2013 10:28 pm

    Existing law provides for a plan to encourage continuity of service in State Government, under which semiannual payments are made to state employees rated standard or better with 8 years or more of continuous service, commonly known as “longevity pay.” (NRS 284.177) Existing law also provides for state employees who are rated standard or better and have not attained the top step of their grade to receive a merit pay increase annually. (NRS 284.175, 284.335; NAC 284.194, 284.196) Those longevity payments and merit pay increases were temporarily suspended by the Legislature during the 2009-2011 and 2011-2013 biennia. (Chapter 276, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 1164, as amended by chapter 465, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2642; Chapter 475, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2888) Section 1 of this bill continues the suspension of the longevity payments for the 2013-2015 biennium and continues the suspension of the merit pay increases for the Fiscal Year 2013-2014. During the 2009-2011 biennium, with certain exceptions, state employees were required to take a certain amount of unpaid furlough leave. (Chapter 391, Statutes of Nevada 2009, p. 2159) During the 2011-2013 biennium, state employees were required to take a salary reduction of 2.5 percent and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that was equivalent to a 2.3 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction. (Chapter 374, Statutes of Nevada 2011, p. 2219) Sections 2-5 of this bill require state employees to take a 2.5 percent salary reduction and an amount of unpaid furlough leave that is equivalent to a 1.15 percent salary reduction or, if exempted from the furlough requirements for the protection of the public health, safety or welfare, an additional equivalent salary reduction.

  3. Harold / Apr 15 2013 9:10 pm

    I look at it from a different perspective. I am less than a year from my police and fire “halfway point” until possible retirement. I am a step 4 of 10 steps. Each of the past 5 years, I have taken an additional 4.5 percent hit as I missed my merit increases. That means that I have taken a larger sacrifice than those who are topped out. I have not progress through the steps as they did. While they take the same furloughs and pay cuts that i do, I am stuck near the halfway point while they are topped out. Over the course of my career, those who are topped out and didn’t have “step freezes” will make a greater amount of money for doing the same job. That is just not fair, but Sandoval doesn’t care. He is taking whatever he can. I am a pretty conservative guy, but I will never vote for another idiot republican governor as long as I live.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: